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Deja Vu Blogfest---Old Post--What or Who Inspired You To Write?


For those of you who haven't heard, this is is the first day of the Deja Vu Blogfest hosted by D.L. Hammons, Katie Mills, Lydia Kang, and Nicole Ducleroir.  If you're interested in learning more, stop by any of the above blogs for further details. 

Since I try to focus on topics about writing, I decided to pull the post titled: What or Who Inspired You to write? dated January 2010.  I only received two comments on it so I decided to give it another try.  Looking forward to reading all those great posts out there.  Enjoy. 

What or Who Inspired You to Write?

While visiting Nathan Bransford's blog, I ran across a post where he asked, "How did writer's come up with the idea for their current work in progress (WIP)?" I wish there was some great story that led me to write my novel, that I had some sort of  "Eureka moment," but alas, this was not the case. Only after years of brainstorming did I come up with a way to weave a couple of ideas into a story.

 Although I give Bransford credit for asking an intriguing question, I think one that may be more interesting is, What inspired authors to write in the first place? I'm pretty sure the majority of us aspiring novelists were influenced by fascinating people, or experienced some sort of life changing event.

 In my case, I was exposed to the world of writing early in life. From as far back as I can remember, my mother always wrote. There was hardly a morning that I didn't wake to the rap, tap, tap of her typewriter. I can't tell you the amount of time we spent discussing plot twists and developing characters. When she wasn't writing, she was telling tales. As an Irish woman who loved her scotch whiskey, she never let the truth stand in the way of a good story.

 Although I never inherited mom's love of oral storytelling, nor her appreciation for scotch, I did and still do share her fondness for writing. Unfortunately, I don't think she ever submitted any of her work for publication. It's a shame too, because she was very talented. I learned a lot from her.

 Since I have shared the story behind my inspiration to write, I wonder if any of you would be willing to share yours. If so, I'd be interested to know it.

Until next next week, happy writing.

Comments

  1. Love this post. I have to say, and I think you may be old enough to remember, John-Boy Walton was my inspiration. I saw the Christmas special when Maw and Paw were too poor to buy the kids anything, but in the end they got John-Boy a writing tablet and pen. That stuck with me and that's what I wanted to do too.

    Thanks so much for your comment today. I understand exactly how you feel.

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  2. I've always been a writer, but generally it was private stuff for myself in journals. I wrote my first novel after I had a dream about a patient with purple eyes attacking me. I let a friend read it, and she was so enthusiastic that it made me continue. And now I'm hooked.

    Definitely not a "Eureka" moment, but worked for me! Nice post.

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  3. I love hearing stories how people got into writing. I got started later in life when I became pregnant and had to become stationary. You have a lot of time to think. LOL

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  4. Anne, yes, I remember The Waltons. My mother used to watch it. Unfortunately, back in the 80's we only had a few channels, which had to be manually changed. Do you remember the knobs? Since my mother ran the show we watched what she wanted.

    I don't remember the Christmas episode with the writing tablet and pen, but the fire stands out in my mind. John lost his book and had to begin from scratch. What dedication to the craft. Anywho, thanks for stopping in.

    Wow, Julie. PUrple eyes? That's original and cool too.(: I never journaled much. Think I tried once and my sister and brother found it and read my entries. They made fun of me for days. After that, I learned never to write my private thoughts where someone else could see them. Thanks for stopping by and commenting on my post. Happy holidays.

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  5. Very thought provoking post.

    I have been a storyteller for as long as I can remember - of no particular genre other then for the stories I told my daughter when she was small.

    My actual "write a book" inspiration came in 2004 by chance; then the follower year, at a writers conference, I was given a serious nod after having my work reviewed by a dedicated writer (who tops the New York Times best sellers list regularly) to complete what I had started.

    A minor set back in late 2007 (car accident) derailed me until last year...I am now, often, in the Lost and Found where I am finishing what I started.

    Thanks for sharing your story as well!

    Jenny @ PEARSON REPORT

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  6. Nice post. I never thought I could write a book until I tried, and then when I tried, I found a passion I couldn't let go of.

    Thanks so much for joining the Blogfest!

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  7. Mine was sheer boredom with my PhD. An interesting post.

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  8. That's so cool that your mum wrote. I don't come from a writing family but I think it would be cool to be able to ask advice from those around me...in person.

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  9. Honestly I do not remember who actually inspired me, I have just always loved the process of writing- pen to paper. then in fifth grade as my best friend and I were discussing college, I decided I wanted to be a writer when I grew up. The idea has changed to more of a hobby now that I'm an adult- but I still love writing just as much as ever.

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  10. I'm going to annoy all the life-long writers by admitting that I hated writing at school, stuck to writing technical manuals and requirements documents at work, then had an idea for a scene in a story. I started writing just to see if I could.

    I still have trouble with telling a story though ;)

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  11. First, let me say, 'Thank you.' As I've been reading blogs, I always came across WIP and had no clue what it stood for – now I do. There's another one, YA, that has me lost, also. With that said, I am far from being a writer. The thought of writing a novel gives me nightmares. My attention span is simply too short. In the olden days, I would have made a superb 'Dear Abby' - except maybe a drunk Abby. Few words are all I'm good for, but I try to make them memorable.

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  12. I'm like Summer, I can't recall anybody specific who really inspired me to write. There have been plenty who have encouraged me to write, but that's different. I basically dared myself to write my first novel, and I haven't looked back. :)

    Great topic for a re-post! :)

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  13. Lovely blog...nice post. I like to hear about how writers got started.

    Stop by my blog if you like for an e-book giveaway.

    NEW FOLLOWER

    Elizabeth

    http://silversolara.blogspot.com

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  14. If I were to sum up a long story (which I'll probably blog about sometime... as I do), I write because either, 1) I have ideas for stories I want to tell, or 2) the stories I write are ones I want to read and no-one else has written them! There's a lot more I could say on this, but there it is for now.

    My oldest daughter writes, and I hope my writing endeavors provide her, and any of my other kids that follow this path, inspiration. It's great that your mother inspired you that way.

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  15. Pearson, first of all, I'm sorry to hear about your accident. No doubt it was tough to come back from. I admire your courage. Also, you should be so proud to receive validation from a best selling author. Sometimes it's the litle things in life that keep us writing. Best of luck on your novel.

    Yes, Lydia, once a creative person finds his/ her path to creativity, it's impossible to get off of. For us, writing is the road most traveled. It's addicting.

    Botanist, I think it's normal to experience road blocks along the writing journey. Storytelling is an art that takes time to hone. Keep at it. Best of luck on your novel.

    Mr. Persevere, Y.A. stands for young adult. IMHO (im my humble opinion), anyone who writes voluntarily, regardless if it's a poem or an entire book, must love words. Otherwise, they would not waste their time.

    D.L. I take it the dare helped you to discover your creative path, which so happened to be writing. Best wishes on your journey to publication.

    Elizabeth, book giveaways always catch my attention.(: I will definitely stop by as soon as I finish my comments.

    Written like a true author, Colin Smith. You had a story inside that begged to be let out. If you write there's no doubt your girls children will pick up on it. It's in their blood.(:

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  16. My cp's daughter writes. I think that must be wonderful for a mother and daughter to share the writing experience.

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  17. It was my love of certain stories, or maybe more my love of getting lost in certain stories that drew me into writing. I finally allowed myself to get lost in the stories that lived only as tiny sparks of ideas in my head.

    Great choice for a post to re-run. :)

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  18. Hi Carol, thanks for stopping by. I totally agree. It is also a nice experience for a son and mother as well (or at least I hope that is the case). I was blessed with three sons, two who enjoy writing. Hopefully, we will be able to share the experience someday.

    Nicki, great to have you. It's easy to get lost in one's writing. There are days when my story consumes me. I have to consciously work to balance the rest of my life with my srting.

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  19. I like hearing writers' stories about how they came to call themselves writers. Thanks for sharing your story.

    ReplyDelete

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